Posts tagged: site

Build Your Own Web Site The Right Way Using HTML & CSS, 2nd Edition

By , September 23, 2014 10:59 am

Build Your Own Web Site The Right Way Using HTML & CSS, 2nd Edition

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Build Your Own Website The Right Way Using HTML & CSS, 2nd Edition teaches web development from scratch, without assuming any previous knowledge of HTML, CSS or web development techniques. This book introduces you to HTML and CSS as you follow along with the author, step-by-step, to build a fully functional web site from the ground up. However, unlike countless other "learn web design" books, this title concentrates on modern, best-practice techniques from the very beginning, which means you'll get it right the first time. The web sites you'll build will:Look good on a PC, Mac or Linux computer Render correctly whether your visitors are using Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, or Safari Use web standards so your sites will be fast loading and easy to maintain Be accessible to disabled users who use screenreaders to browse the Web By the end of the book, you'll be equipped with enough knowledge to set out on your first projects as a professional web developer, or you can simply use the knowledge you've gained to create attractive, functional, usable and accessible sites for personal use.

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Top Tips for Web Design

By , September 18, 2014 7:58 am

647

Content is King. The most important thing to remember about popular web sites is that they are always rich in content.

search engine optimization, search engine marketing, seo, sem, internet marketing, website analysis, search engine submissions, pay per click programs, pay per click management, ppc, pay for inclusion, organic search engine listings, online marketing, keyword analysis, linking packages, multi lingual promotion services,content analysis, site analysis, search engine ranking reports, search engine placement, search engine submissions, search engine promotion

Content is King. The most important thing to remember about popular web sites is that they are always rich in content.

Stick to your subject. Don’t try to be all things to all people. Keep your goal in mind. Creating a web site is challenging and fun. The temptation to put as many bells and whistles as you can on a page is almost overwhelming. But unless your site is involved with bells and whistles, don’t do it! The purpose of designing a site carefully is not to make it look cool, or win awards. It’s to accomplish the intended goal of the site. It’s a good idea to write down the goal of your the site before starting any design work. It will help you make design designs for the site as a whole.

First impressions count! Think about the message you are sending to your customer. The first page of your web site should be a concise description of the website. Don’t make this page too busy – entice visitors to dig deeper into your site through the use of inviting text and interesting graphics. If you are serious about your business, buy your own domain name and don’t use a “free” hosting service.

Design sites, not pages. Your primary concern should be the site’s overall design. When starting to design a new site from scratch, you should try to create a design that will make sense to users, has a consistent look and feel, and is not to difficult to extend in the future. The consistency of design of a site is one of the factors that differentiates amateur sites from professional ones.

Make it easy to get around your site. Your customer should be able to easily navigate to any page in your web from any page in your page. It’s important to link in a consistent, well thought out manner that users can learn to navigate. Have clear links to your pages and, if are selling a product, make it easy for people to buy it! Show your business name, address, phone number and E-mail address on each an every page. Invite customers to contact you with their questions or comments. Add links to other sites only when necessary, or on a special links page at the end of your site. You want visitors to go through your site before surfing off to another!

View your site through the eyes of a stranger. Once you have completed you site outline, view it in other browsers. Does it look like you wanted it to look?

Don’t forget to tell the world about your new site. Make sure that your URL is on all your company business cards, letter heads, brochures, phone systems, etc. Swap links with other related web sites and consider banner advertising. List your site with the major search engines, but read their rules of submission first!

Keep your site current. Come up with a reason for people to visit and revisit your pages and recommend them to their friends. This could be a series of articles giving tips, a daily cartoon, or other attention catching event. The words most likely to attract visitors are: Free and Special. Be sure you offer something of value if you uses these words!

Survey says… Ask users about your site. Create a survey and give a reward for responding. Ask friends to check out the site, then grill them on what they thought about it. This can be valuable input on what improvements are needed. Often, users can be thrown by things a designer might never see as a problem. Don’t ever stop looking for ways to improve your website. Subscribe to professional E-zines, and keep surfing the web doing market research. What are your competitors doing better? Ask for feedback from your friends, relatives and customers. They will often see things with fresh eyes.

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Reinventing Your Homepage

By , August 13, 2014 4:37 pm

422

Everyone struggles to make their sites appealing. Nonetheless, only a few has discovered the formula behind pretty and serviceable site.

Web Development Services, E-commerce web development services, Web site development services, E-commerce website development services

Everyone struggles to make their sites appealing. Nonetheless, only a few has discovered the formula behind pretty and serviceable site.

Some sites need little alterations but some need total overhauling. The latter, being the most taxing than the former, has to start off on the right foot. What does it take to have tempting and pleasurable sites?

First, a site must have focus or concentration leading to a goal. Be sure not to leave the site wanting in details. Say everything that needs to be said. The contents must be material to the site’s objectives. Place in graphics that are valuable to the site. Bear in mind that the color, design and layout must agree to what you are saying. However, do not give beyond what is expected. Overdoing it invites confusion by reason of smorgasbord of links and all sorts.

Focus means organization of ideas and graphics. The more organized the homepage is, the better.

Another attribute of a good homepage is empathy. Marketing involves not just logic but a greater doze of matters of the heart. Persuasion is the key to a successful marketing strategy thus, this is also vital in websites most especially to homepages since they are primarily used to market products and services.

When visitors come to a certain site, their expectation is to be served and get solutions or answers. Therefore, your site must cater to the individual needs of these visitors. That way they can be satisfied and comfortable with your site. This will further build trust and loyalty between visitors and your site. This trust can yield you visitors and probable purchasers.

To empathize, you have to know first the possible reasons why visitors come to your site. Next, the class of visitors and level of knowledge they have in connection to your product and services. Be sure to answer all the doubts in their minds as well as needs, feelings and habits because that will affect the decisions they will be making.

The third thing to consider ?is the ‘call to action? This is the most important yet the most neglected attribute of a site. Without this, your site will be wasted.

Visitors want to know the action plan and they should get what they are supposed to do. The action plan can be getting information, buying the product, signing up for a service and the likes. Give a strong, persuasive and clear action plan to get the results you desire.

Reinvent and invigorate you homepage by making it stunning and functional!

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How affordable websites can make you money

By , July 28, 2014 8:45 pm

893

Do you have a website that doesn’t bring you any business? There’s a myth circulating that you have to invest a fortune to make money through the web. Of course the likes of Amazon and eBay have thrown cash at their websites and are reaping the rewards, but I’m not talking about companies of that size. Budget websites can also generate income with the right approach.

Affordable Web Sites,Visitor Conversion,Most Desired Response,Small Business Website,Targeted Market

  • Do you have a website that doesn’t bring you any business?
  • Are you worried about investing more money in a website that isn’t performing?

Well here is some good news: affordable websites can make you money!

There’s a myth circulating that you have to invest a fortune to make money through the web. Of course the likes of Amazon and eBay have thrown cash at their websites and are reaping the rewards, but I’m not talking about companies of that size. Budget websites can also generate income with the right approach.

The great thing about doing business online is that you can keep your overheads low. No need for expensive shop fronts, offices, printed brochures or a large workforce. Ideal for the small business without endless capital resources.

It is perfectly possible to do business via the web and make a tidy profit using a modest website on a small budget, providing you follow some basic rules regarding content and structure, and concentrate on converting visitors into sales.

I read a fascinating article last week, by Michael L. McGrath of MLM Celtic Enterprises, which successfully articulated some similar ideas that I have been talking to my clients about recently:

“Every web site has a Most Desired Response, that which the the site owner wants the visitor to do while visiting, and that MDR needs to be identified. The site’s design and content need to be crafted tightly and well around the MDR, identify it with absolute clarity, and remove all obstacles that might prevent a visitor from the response.”

That – in a nutshell – is the key to a successful, profitable website, and it need not cost the earth!

It’s amazing how many start-ups fail to grasp this idea, and then complain that their website fails to bring them any business. Imagine that. If you follow a few basic rules, you can produce websites that actually bring you business.

Concentrate on the following:

  • identifying your Most Desired Response
  • identifying your target audience
  • structuring your site and preparing content, based on your MDR and your target audience.

Identify your site’s Most Desired Response

Rather than thinking about how you would like your site to perform, think about how you would like your customers to behave. There’s a subtle but crucial difference.

More often than not, your MDR will be a visitor buying your product or service. By the way, if you want to take online credit/debit card transactions, you can use PayPal, which is quick and easy to set up. All you need is a bank account to get started.

But your Most Desired Response doesn’t have to involve an online transaction. Very often an MDR will be making a phone call, making contact via email, or simply registering personal or business details.

Be sure of your target audience

Successful small businesses identify and corner niche markets, rather than attempt to take on the world! This is doubly important for online marketing, because you will want to avoid competitive keywords when preparing your content for the search engines.

Structure your site and prepare your content

Once you have established your MDR and identified your Target Market, you can begin to structure your site. The structure and content of your site should serve exclusively to trigger the Most Desired Response from your Target Market. Anything which does not fulfill this criterion is superfluous and should be discarded. Be ruthless about this. Avoid building in gimmicks to your

site, which only serve to distract your visitors from the MDR.

I recommend drawing a flow chart which maps your visitors’ journey beginning with the keywords they enter into Google, and tracking their movement through your site to the holy grail – the Most Desired Response.

When preparing your content, you will need to bear two things in mind. Firstly, it has to comply with the MDR. Avoid superfluous waffle, and make sure everything you say is leading your visitor towards that all important conversion. Secondly, you will need to make sure that your content attracts your target audience to the site in the first place – via the search engines. Start by identifying the right keywords – or more accurately keyphrases – and then ensure that they feature in your content.

In the online world, niche markets take on an even more important role, when you come to choose keywords. The big boys will have the generic keywords sewn up already, and those keywords won’t bring you targeted traffic anyway. If you can concentrate on a specialist or localised market so
much the better. You will stand a far better chance of driving targeted traffic to your site and generating hot leads. Of course you need to make sure that your keywords are not so specialised that none of your potential customers are using them. It’s a fine balancing act. Nichebot offers a useful tool for working out the most productive keywords.

So you see, none of this is going to cost you the earth. A great deal of thinking and research (I never said it was easy!), but not a great deal of money. Quite the reverse: if you follow the rules, you will soon be making money.

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Above the Fold: Understanding the Principles of Successful Web Site Design

By , May 27, 2014 11:06 am

Above the Fold: Understanding the Principles of Successful Web Site Design

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Above the Fold is a book about the fundamentals of effective graphic communication set in the context of Web design. Unlike other books that focus on the intersection of design and technology, Above the Fold explores the relationship between the stakeholders of a Web project-- the designer, the user and the client -- and how this continuous cycle affects the decisions made by successful Web designers. Above the Fold is not technical manual or a how-to book, nor is it about timely trends; it's about the timeless fundamentals of layout, usability and measurement that lead to a successful digital product. 

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Communicating Design: Developing Web Site Documentation for Design and Planning (2nd Edition) (Voices That Matter)

By , March 18, 2014 10:27 am

Communicating Design: Developing Web Site Documentation for Design and Planning (2nd Edition) (Voices That Matter)

Communicating Design: Developing Web Site Documentation for Design and Planning (2nd Edition) (Voices That Matter) Rating:
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Successful web design teams depend on clear communication between developers and their clients—and among members of the development team. Wireframes, site maps, flow charts, and other design diagrams establish a common language so designers and project teams can capture ideas, track progress, and keep their stakeholders informed.   In this all new edition of Communicating Design, author and information architect Dan Brown defines and describes each deliverable, then offers practical advice for creating the documents and using them in the context of teamwork and presentations, independent of methodology. Whatever processes, tools, or approaches you use, this book will help you improve the creation and presentation of your wireframes, site maps, flow charts, and other deliverables.   The book now features:   An improved structure comprising two main sections: Design Diagrams and Design Deliverables. The first focuses on the nuts and bolts of design documentation and the second explains how to pull it all together.  New deliverable: design briefs, as well as updated advice on wireframes, flow charts, and concept models.  More illustrations, to help designers understand the subtle variations and approaches to creating design diagrams. Reader exercises, for those lonely nights when all you really want to do is practice creating wireframes, or for use in workshops and classes. Contributions from industry leaders: Tamara Adlin, Stephen Anderson, Dana Chisnell, Nathan Curtis, Chris Fahey, James Melzer, Steve Mulder, Donna Spencer, and Russ Unger.   “As an educator, I have looked to Communicating Design both as a formal textbook and an informal guide for its design systems that ultimately make our ideas possible and the complex clear.” —Liz Danzico, from the Foreword

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Good Web Design

By , February 8, 2014 3:27 pm

454

In today’s highly technical world, everything is online. There is nothing you cannot buy, sell, trade, research, find pictures of, or play if you have a computer and Internet connection. These days, there is a web site out there for anything you could name.

Which means that someone probably has a web site a lot like yours? As competition for page views grows more intense, web design more technical, and the Internet more popular, good web design becomes more important than …

web design, web development

In today’s highly technical world, everything is online. There is nothing you cannot buy, sell, trade, research, find pictures of, or play if you have a computer and Internet connection. These days, there is a web site out there for anything you could name.

Which means that someone probably has a web site a lot like yours? As competition for page views grows more intense, web design more technical, and the Internet more popular, good web design becomes more important than ever before. If you have a web site, then you want visitors to view that site. Good web design is the only way to make that happen.

The average Internet cruiser is more jaded these days, harder to impress. Good web design is the only way to get repeat visitors. There are several basic key elements to good web design that every web designer must know how to use.

Content. Internet search engines have grown very clever about searching content on web sites these days. Good web design is centered on your web site’s content. What keywords will people search to find your site? Once you know what your keywords are, you have to have plenty of content on your site that features those keywords. There are several free web sites that allow you to check your keyword content. Use them. Content is what search engines look at first, so it is here that you must make your impression.

Links. Search engines, and your visitors, love links. You want links that connect to other pages of your site, internal links, as well as external links that connect to pages outside your domain. The more links you have, the better, so use them liberally throughout your site. Links also improve the navigation of your site, which is incredibly important to good web design.

Graphics. Bright colors, pictures, and fun fonts will make or break your web site. Graphics are going to fly at Internet cruisers every way they look, so you want to make an impression with the graphics on your site. Good web design is about a pleasing flow of colors, pictures, graphics, and text. Don’t over clutter your pages, but make them exciting and interesting to look at.

Good web design is about learning how to balance key elements that appeal to search engines and your viewers. Your pages should flow together, your navigation should be easy, and your site filled with content. The only way to increase traffic to your site is through good web design that is updated regularly. This will ensure repeat, and new, business to your site. The more visitors you have, the better. Good web design is the only way to make that happen.

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Good Links: 7 guidelines how to improve usability

By , January 31, 2014 5:25 pm

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Creating good links is vital for creating a good site. A link for instance is the only possibility an e-shop has to have users put products into the shopping basket. If that link should be badly written or confusingly placed, many users would give up before buying. That would be like not accepting money from a client standing right in front of you. Following are 7 tips how links should be written to improve the usability of your site.

link creation,usability,writing,online authoring,web

How you write and design your links is crucial to your visitors clicking them or not. Write them badly and they leave, write them well and they stay. Who knows, they might even do exactly that what you created your site for. Following are 7 guidelines how links should be written to improve the usability of your site.

Do it consistently
Visitors learn for example how a website marks the links or where the “related-content box” can be found. Consistently adhering to these established “codes” will make it easy to navigate and read the site.

Breaking these conventions will interrupt the flow. Such distractions might be enough for the user to leave. When creating a site it is important to define all the conventions and rules that are used. Consistently following them is essential for giving the user an easy time when visiting.

Don’t mislead the visitor
Although links can look however the screen-designer decides, certain standards have developed and find widespread use. Underlining a text for example is a common indicator.

It is good practice not to underline text, marking it blue or putting an arrow in front, if is not a link. Visitors might construe them to be clickable.

The same applies to images. Many users will try to click on a graphic or any other image. Very rarely, they will find an active link – a tiny, but nevertheless negative experience. Captions have proven to be effective to add that little bit of content that users need in order not to click on an image. And if a link is present, it can be placed in the caption itself.

Show used links
Marking which links have been visited is very valuable. It helps to quickly “tick off” when going through a site or helps in finding this piece of information from a previous visit. Unfortunately, a great many sites do not use this very basic feature.

If the “visited” feature should also extend to the navigation is debatable. On very deep sites it might be useful. On the other hand it might confuse the visitor. The navigation should be a constant and change only minimally.

Match the destination with the link
Clicking on a link can be compared to following road signs in a city never visited before – you are very happy if you get confirmation that the choice you just made was the one intended.

Same thing applies to links – if a link reads “find out more about our services” the page that it relates to should show the words “Our Services” somewhere prominently in the title. It confirms the action taken.

Well written titles indicate clearly what the main topic is on the page. This is very useful, especially considering that a lot of traffic directly dives deep into the page.

Embedded links used to their full advantage
Links are visually different than the surrounding text. Color, a markup or other cues denote a link. Something maybe even happens before you click – mouse-over effects or an overlay, displaying the title.

Everything is designed to draw your eyes away from the surrounding text. If you embed links within a sentence, readers will very likely notice the link first and only later read your content. On first thought that is unfortunate, but it can be turned into an advantage.

Since reading online involves lots of scanning, the eye is always looking for visual cues. They can be provided by using subtitles or in this case descriptive links. By creating a meaningful link, finding the relevant information on a page is made easier. “Click here” is less effective then “View a list of articles about usability”.

How to link to files
When linking to a file it is likely that another application is opened and that the visitor is drawn away from the site. Not something that should be done lightly.

A great many times websites link to related documents, very often PDF files. What exactly can be found in the file, the visitor needs to figure out from the link itself. The first step in creating a good link to a document is to summarize the content. That gives the visitor information how he wants to proceed.

The second step is more basic by asking why the document cannot be created as a webpage. If it is worth to be put onto the site, it surely is worth the effort to make if searchable, fully integrated and less work for the visitor. Using for instance PDF-files can make sense. Very often however, it is simply easier for the developer to put it onto the site – but not easier for the visitor to use it.

Mark the external links
An internal link refers to a page or file within the current domain, an external link usually points to a site, housed on a remote domain.
Although technically there is no difference in how the code for the links is written, it is common usage, even a w3.org recommendation, to inform the user if an external site is accessed by a link.

The rationale behind this is not to confuse the visitor who is getting used to the layout, navigation and architecture of a particular site. An external link can either be declared by stating it in the text, by a specific icon (like for instance Wikipedia does) or even by using the “title” tag of a link.

Whether the new site is opened in a new browser-window or replaces the current content could depend on the kind of information the visitor will find. It could be argued that sites with related content or sites who delve further into a topic might best be opened in a new window. The visitor can more easily relate back to the original site. In that case not only the external link, but maybe also the fact of a new window opening should be placed with the link.

Creating good links is vital for creating a good site. A link for instance is the only possibility an e-shop has to have users put products into the shopping basket. If that link should be badly written or confusingly placed, many users would give up before buying. That would be like not accepting money from a client standing right in front of you.

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Building a Web Site For Dummies

By , January 28, 2014 11:06 am

Building a Web Site For Dummies

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The bestselling guide to building a knockout Web site, newly updatedAn effective Web site is the key to success for every venture from class reunions to major corporations. And since Web technology changes rapidly, Building a Web Site For Dummies, 4th Edition is fully updated for the cutting-edge tools and trends.If you need to build and maintain a Web site, even if your experience is severely limited, this book makes it easy and fun. You'll learn to plan, design, create, launch, and maintain your site using the most up-to-date tools.A quality Web presence is essential in today's marketplace, and many individuals charged with creating one are unaware of the challengesThis guide gives novice Web designers the tools and know-how to plan, design, and build effective Web sitesProvides a nuts-and-bolts guide to site-building, including coverage of HTML, WYSIWYG construction software, CSS, and navigation plansShows how to spruce up your site with topnotch graphics, video, and great contentGuides you through getting your site online, promoting it, and even making money from itBuilding a Web Site For Dummies, 4th Edition is the tool every first-time Web designer needs to build a professional-looking site.

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Top 10 Ways Websites Makes Me Suffer

By , December 23, 2013 3:39 am

1218

Learn what makes one Web designer scream out in pain.

web design, humor, how to build a website, design mistakes, look and feel, web colors, internet, e-marekting, internet marketing,

I believe some people create and publish websites for the sole purpose of tormenting their visitors. Browsing various websites and navigating the Web can often be like trying to read on an airplane while a kid kicks the back of your seat and the baby next to you alternates between screaming, crying and drooling on you. There are some excellent websites out there to be sure, but there are also a lot of dreadful ones too. The latter are the bane of so many people’s existence, especially those who use the Web regularly.

The Net continues to grow in popularity and importance for consumers and businesses alike. Therefore, the quality of sites needs to keep pace. Creating and maintaining high-quality websites is more important now than ever. Higher quality equals more revenue.

The following lists the top ten ways that a website misses the boat and contributes to hair loss and nervous breakdowns. Notice the common thread that runs throughout each of these. Namely, a bad website neglects to consider the site visitor’s experience in some fundamental ways.

1. Animation
Seven year-olds like watching animated cartoons on Saturday morning, business people, professionals and most other adults don’t. Sites that include showy Flash animations as an ‘Intro? animated gifs on every page, or flying words are really annoying. They take away from the content and distract the visitor from achieving their goals. Unless your site is an entertainment site, try to avoid maddening motion. However, if your product or service can be better demonstrated using Flash, Quick Time, or other multimedia, which is common, offer your visitors the chance to click a link to view it. But don’t force them.

2. Too much scrolling
Once I scroll down a full screen’s worth, my eyes start to blur, I feel slightly lost, my head spins and my interest wanes. Computer monitors really aren’t the best medium for reading. The Net and many sites are so big that it’s important to always provide a clear frame of reference for your visitors at all times while they’re on your site. If a page requires two full screens of scrolling or more, simply split it up into multiple pages.

3. Long, text-heavy and blocky paragraphs of unbroken text
I really have to be into a topic or desperately need to glean the information to trudge through big chunks of unbroken text online. If I’m just shopping around for a product or service, you’ve lost me if I have to endure this kind of torture. Again, it is harder to read text on the Web than in other mediums such as books. Additionally, Web users are notoriously impatient, so make your content easy to read and non-intimidating. Use titles, sub-titles, small paragraphs, bullets and numbering.

4. No obvious ways to contact the company
If all you supply is an email on your website, your legitimacy may be questioned. Why can’t you answer the phone? Why hide behind an anonymous and cold email address? Make it easy for your existing and potential customers to talk with you.

5. Unchanging or out-date content
If I start reading content on a site and soon discover that the content was written three years ago, I split. Since there’s so much information out there, my reasoning is there’s got to be comparable information online that’s more current. If you keep your content fresh your site will attract repeat visitors. And repeat visitors are more likely to turn into customers.

6. Long page downloads
It’s amazing that this is still a problem. When I click on to a site and have to sit there waiting for it to appear in my browser, I start sweating, picking my teeth, tapping my toes, rolling my eyes and soon want to throw my computer through my office window. I’m obviously a little impatient, but again, I know there are other sites out there with the same information that will download more quickly, so why wait? I’m gone.

7. “Me, me, me!?instead of “You, you, you?Generally speaking, no one cares about you, your company or your thoughts. What they do care about is what you can do for them. So sites that show pictures of the company building or tout their deep philosophy on the way business should be conducted really don’t bode well for keeping the interest of site visitors. On the other hand, sites that speak directly to potential customers about how they can solve their problems, make their lives easier, safer, richer or more comfortable have a much better chance of keeping the eyeballs glued.

8. Non-explanatory buttons or links
Here are some examples of buttons that leave me dazed and confused: A wedding site with a button called ‘Blanks? a boating site with a button named ‘The Lighthouse? a book site with a button called ‘The Inside Story? or a Web design site with a button called ‘Tea Time? They sound like Jeopardy categories. Imagine trying to find your way on a highway where its various signs read ‘Over Here? ‘Moon Beams? and ‘Lollypops? Good luck navigating your way through. It’s the same with navigating websites. Button and link names need to tell the visitor where the link leads to. Make it as easy as possible for a visitor to know where they’re going before they click. However, there are times when naming a link an ambiguous name may pique the curiosity of a user and get them to click on it. But as a general rule, keep your links and buttons as descriptive as possible.

9. Inconsistent navigation
Imagine sitting down at a restaurant and the waiter comes over to you and hands you five different menus, one for the appetizers, one for the soups and salads, one for the entrees, one for the desserts, and one for the drinks. Annoying. Now imagine if each menu had a different format, layout and method for listing the items. Brutal. I really don’t want to work that hard at picking out my dinner, I’m hungry and I just want a meal. Don’t make your visitors work hard either by expecting them to re-learn your navigation system each time they enter another section of your site. They too are hungry; for useful information and they’re even more impatient.

10. Inconsistent look & feel
When the look & feel completely changes from one page to another in a website, I think I am visiting another site, another company, a partner or subsidiary. I get very confused. This screams poor planning and often results from tacking on new sections later after the original site was built. This can lead to design-drift. It may be tempting to stray from the original design; you may have a better design now. But wait till you do a complete next-generation re-design of the entire site before introducing a new look & feel. If not, lots of visitors will be scratching their heads with one hand and possibly clicking away with the other.

Finally, any site that employs a number of these notorious features is particularly painful to experience. When I click to a website that has five different fonts and colors, scrolls down to the core of the Earth, incorporates zinging words and big fat blocks of text, lists no phone number and has content written and dated in 1996, I scream and know deep down inside that pulling my fingernails out wouldn’t be as torturous as having to remain there a minute longer.

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